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“St. Johnians” are always eager to share the history of their communities and culture. The Annaberg Sugar Plantation hosts exhibitions, concerts, and arts and crafts fairs. The self-guided Annaberg Historic Trail takes visitors through restored ruins on the plantation grounds. Petroglyphs created by Arawak Indians can be found along the Reef Bay Trail in Virgin Islands National Park. Volunteers can join scientists at the Cinnamon Bay archaeological dig to help uncover 500 years of ceremonial activity of the Taino Indians.

The beaches of St. John are as breathtaking as they are diverse. Whatever you’re looking for, you’ll find one to your liking. Have a relaxing time in world-famous Trunk Bay. Enjoy the secluded Salt Pond Bay for a bit more privacy. For a more family-oriented atmosphere, check out Maho Bay, where waters are calm and shallow, perfect for the little ones. Be in the middle of the action in Cinnamon Bay, where snorkeling, windsurfing, kayaking and proximity to land activities provide plenty to do.

The water activities on St. John are just as incredible as the white sandy beaches. Whether newly certified or a more advanced diver, it’s possible to encounter more than 500 species of fish, 40 types of coral and hundreds of invertebrates inhabiting the water. Vibrant blue tang, silvery horse-eye jacks, queen triggerfish, spiny lobster and cleaner gobies are just a sampling of the marine life populating the underwater terrain.

Want to know more about St. John? Head to visitUSVI.com to explore St. John a little deeper, as well as other destinations of the U.S. Virgin Islands, including St. Thomas and St. Croix. See for yourself why the locals like to call the islands “so nice!”

Fun Fact

Sixty percent of St. John is protected national park, as are 51 square kilometers of offshore coral reefs.
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Sixty percent of St. John is protected national park, as are 51 square kilometers of offshore coral reefs.